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Updated Recommendations for Safe Swaddling

This summer, the Children’s Hip Program launched a safe swaddling initiative under the direction of Tim Schrader, M.D., Medical Director, and Dennis Fredette, P.T., Clinical Director for Orthopaedics.  Studies show that improper swaddling, with the infant’s legs tightly wrapped with the knees and hips out straight and held closely together, can lead to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The program includes education for physicians and staff on safe swaddling techniques for them to teach to patient families. Visit www.choa.org/swaddlingpros to view our educational video.

In addition, the Hip Program team has developed resources that you can share with your patients, available at www.choa.org/swaddling. Resources include a video designed for patient families that practices can link to from their own practice’s site—the video will soon be available in Spanish.

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By eaponte
May 07, 2012
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Last Saturday, April 28th,the Fowler YMCA here in Peachtree Corners joined with hundreds of YMCAs across the country in hosting their annual “Healthy Kids Day”. One hundred fifty families filled the Atrium of the Y learning tips for healthy living from a variety of different resources.

 Staff members from Pediatric Associates of North Atlanta were happy to participate in this community event.  We measured height and weight, provided vision screening, calculated BMI (Body Mass Index), and provided information to parents about the importance of tracking BMI. But, of course, the favorite activity at our booth was the face painting!

There were arts and crafts, games, inflatables to play on and demonstrations from the karate and gymnastics classes at the Y. Climbing in the fire engine was very exciting and everyone enjoyed the puppet show. If you missed the event this year, be looking out for it next year. 

By eaponte
April 27, 2012
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As an active leader in our community, Pediatric Associates of North Atlanta, P.C. has partnered with The Forum at Peachtree Corners as well as the Robert D. Fowler Family YMCA in producing the 2012 Run The Corners 5K road race.  Many of our staff members participated in the actual race.  We had the privilege of participating in the race activities as a sponsor as well as the ten year celebration of The Forum.  Proceeds from the race were donated to the YMCA Partner With Youth campaign.  The Partner With Youth annual campaign benefits children and families by helping them participate in YMCA programs through scholarship funds.  Dr. Desoutter and Dr. Zager donated their time to interact with the families of our community during the festivities.  For more information on the race or how to make a donation go to www.runthecorners.com

By eaponte
April 17, 2012
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A word from our Doctors,

 

 Spring Temperatures have arrived, and hopefully you have been outside enjoying this beautiful weather.  Some of you probably spent a good bit of your spring break by the pool or at the beach and have started thinking about sunscreen.  There are many options out there and a few important things to keep in mind when selecting a good sunscreen for your family.

Always look for an SPF of at least 15 or 30.  Although we tend to think the higher the better, beyond 30 doesn’t make a significant difference in sun protection.  It is important to have a product that has broad spectrum protection from UVA and UVB rays.  If your child has sensitive skin, you may want to try to avoid specific ingredients, such as looking for a PABA-free product.  You could do a test patch by applying sunscreen to a small area on your child’s arm to see if they have a reaction.  An actual sun blocker such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide can be beneficial, as some people may be sensitive to avobenzone, a common sunscreen ingredient. 

An even more important point than which sunscreen product you select is that we often don’t use enough sunscreen, and we don’t reapply early  and often enough.  Every 2 hours is a good rule, particularly during peak sun hours between 10am and 4pm.  Apply sunscreen while you’re at home, about 15 minutes before going outside.  We all know that when kids catch sight of a swimming pool, they want to jump right in.  Better to let the sunscreen dry and get absorbed before they take the plunge. 

A few more tips to keep in mind:

-consider sticks or wipes if you have a hard time applying to small areas such as the face

-remember a hat and eye protection

-don’t forget lip balm with SPF

-water-resistant products are a good idea, as you’re usually sweating, even if you’re not in the water

-clothing with SPF protection is available

-a more expensive product doesn’t mean it’s better!

-young children don’t necessarily need a product specific for babies as they aren’t significantly different

-sunscreens have an expiration date

-apply more sunscreen than you think you need to!

By eaponte
March 26, 2012
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A message from our doctors,

Spring is in the air, and for many of us, that means baseball and softball seasons are in full swing. At PANA, we encourage safe physical activity at all ages. Although both baseball and softball are considered relatively safe sports, some common sense guidelines should be followed in order to prevent injury. In the article below from the journal Pediatrics, you can find the stats regarding the maximum number of pitches children of varying ages should throw, rest requirements, early warning signs of elbow and shoulder overuse injury and much more. Let's enjoy the Spring - and play ball - safely!

pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e842.full.html

 



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Saturday: 8:30am sick visits only by appointment, during the regular school year only
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